4K video of torch-lit Noh performance in Kyoto

A beautiful video digest of the 2018 Heian Jingū Takigi Noh, the open-air, torch-lit noh performance taking place at Heian Shrine every year on June 1-2. Udaka Michishige is featured performing Hashi Benkei from min. 1:15. Check it out!

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Noh theatre and videogames, again

Deigan certainly is one of noh theatre’s most perplexing mask, one of the most difficult to define because of its eerie expression and ‘human yet non-human’ features. It is in fact used for a number of different characters, from malevolent spirits to ghosts of elegant courtiers, to dragon goddesses. So much that Square Enix designers picked it up for a character (a villain of course) in one of their forthcoming videogames.

Here below is how a real deigan mask would look like.

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Deigan 泥岩, by Otsuki Kokun

Flowers of Performance: Noh workshops in Portland

Noh workshops and performances to be held in Portland September 29 – October 2, 2018

From the University of Oregon Center for Asian and Pacific Studies website:

The Center for Asian and Pacific Studies is pleased to present four days of events on Traditional Japanese Noh Theatre, to be held at the University of Oregon, the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, and the Portland Art Museum. The events, which will include performances and workshops, are to be led by TAKEDA Tomoyuki, an active performer from one of the most prestigious schools of Noh, the Kanze School. Established in the fourteenth century, Noh is characterized by austere simplicity of performance and profoundly poetic plots. In a series of four workshops (two of which will be accompanied by costumed performance), Takeda-sensei and his troupe will cover a range of topics from history, dance and chanting to costumes and masks. Audiences will have the opportunity to take part in a dance and chanting sequence, and to learn about costumes through dressing demonstrations.

Read the whole article here.

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The 4th Tatsushige no Kai: Tanikō 谷行 June 30 2018

On June 30 2018 Udaka Tatsushige will perform the noh Tanikō 谷行, a rarely performed play set in the world of shugendō, a syncretic religion fusing Buddhist beliefs with the worship of natural elements. The followers of shugendō, known as yamabushi (mountain-priests) perform austerities during their pilgrimages across the sacred mountains between the present-day Osaka and Nara prefectures.

This noh is full of action, featuring a group of yamabushi forced to sacrifice one of their young acolytes by hurling him down a valley, and the intervention of a fierce deity who coming to rescue the child.

Tanikō famously inspired Bertolt Brecht’s school operas Jasager/Neinsager.

All information on the play and on how to reserve your seat HERE.

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— Diego Pellecchia

 

Pieces to study this summer

Sakuragawa – ami no dan. Dance and chant, for my first solo chant performance with one drum (dokuchō).

Hanjo – maibayashi. Chū-no-mai, technically not difficult. However the character of Hanako is very complex and wills be difficult to render. Also, the chant is rather difficult. This will be in preparation for a forthcoming performance in Kyoto, in which I will sing in the chorus.

Raku ware and Noh masks exhibition in Kyoto

The exhibition “The wabi of Raku and the yūgen of Noh: the aesthetics of form” has opened today at the Raku Museum in Kyoto. The exhibition displays tea bowls made according to the raku tradition of pottery and noh masks from various collections. Among the items on display are some ancient masks belonging to the Kongō Iemoto collection. See a list (in English) of the works on display here
The wabi of Raku and the yūgen of Noh: the aesthetics of form

Saturday 17 March – Sunday 24 June 2018

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Restaurant with Noh stage to open in Tokyo this month

Suigian (水戯庵), a sushi restaurant featuring a noh stage, is set to open in Nihonbashi (Tokyo) on March 20, 2018. The restaurant will offer daily performances of Noh and Kyogen. I have mixed feelings about it. Yes offering this kind of performance is not philologically incorrect as people did eat drink and even smoke inside noh theatres in the past. Yes, we need to bring more people closer to noh so we should embrace ways to popularize it. But would you like to watch noh with the noise of people drinking cheering chewing etc? With the smell of food and alcoholic burps in the air? Would performers like it? The restaurant looks posh enough and is endorsed by performers (you can see famous actors and musicians featuring the photos on the website) still…  I wonder what plays they will perform… in the case of Noh, I can think of very few that I would enjoy watching while having something in my stomach… I wonder what you guys think!

Suigian

 

‘Tea ceremony and drum beats from Japan’ – news from Ōkura Genjirō’s performance in India

Kolkata, Feb 27 (IBNS)  Drinking tea is so common to us in India that only a personal choice, Darjeeling orthodox or Assam’s CTC, can become a debatable point. But in Japan, the process of tea making and drinking evolved into an elaborate ceremony that can stretch from 40 to 45 minutes.

— Read on m.indiablooms.com/life-details/L/3509/tea-ceremony-and-drum-beats-from-japan.html