Live subtitles on tablet at Noh performances

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This is something I’ve been involved in recently, translating Japanese into English for Hinoki Noh publishing house. I hope I will be able to translate texts in Italian too, some day! Multilingual subtitles at the Noh theatre would be amazing.

The picture above shows the introductory section spectators can read before the performance begins. After that the audience can follow the action on stage while reading brief descriptions automatically updating on the screen as the play progresses. Pages have black background and white characters, minimizing the annoying effect of bright screens in the semi-darkness of the playhouse.

See the Japan Times article on this service here.

 

Noh Charity Performance for Kumamoto

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Kanze and Kongo school Noh actors, as well as Kyogen actors will perform in a 2-part charity event as part of the Kumamoto earthquake relief effort.

Performances will take place on August 25th at the newly-built Rohm Theatre in Kyoto (Okazaki area). The first section (from 10:30) features the Noh TsunemasaHagoromo, the Kyogen Busu and the half-noh Kokaji. The second section (from 18:30) features the Noh Funa-BenkeiHagoromo, the Kyogen Bo-shibari and the half-noh Shari.

Tickets (1,500yen general admission) are available from June 1st. Each part requires a different ticket. Contact me if you are interested in purchasing a ticket.

Kumamoto Charity August 2016.jpg

Next challenge: an important tsure role

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img_4850My teacher’s son Udaka Norishige is preparing to perform as shite in the play Kayoi Komachi, at the bimonthly training session his father organises. When my schedule permits (they usually do this in the morning) I join in a chorus member, but this time I will take the tsure companion of the shite role. In Kayoi Komachi this is a rather demanding role as the tsure (the ghost of the Heian period poetess Ono no Komachi) acts alone during the first half of the play, de-facto acting as a shite.

It will be challenging also because it is the first time I take on a female role in a full play. I will need to practice hard to train my voice to sing in a ‘feminine mode’, (though this kind of mode still sounds quite manly to the untrained ear).

 

Noh Reimagined in London

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A wonderful series of Noh events coming up in London!


Noh Reimagined – The Contemporary Art of Classical Japanese Theatre

Friday 13 and Saturday 14 May 2016, Kings Place, London

Art, Music, Dance & The Divine

Noh originated in the 14th century and has been performed continuously since, making it among the oldest unbroken performance traditions in the world. Noh’s aesthetic concepts, unique musical rhythms and tempos influenced many Western artists in the 20th century, including Benjamin Britten. This two-day festival explores the art of Noh, which continues to inspire many practitioners across diverse art forms.

King Place continue their collaboration with Akiko Yanagisawa of mu: arts in presenting some of the foremost Noh performers from Japan to the UK. These performers, all of whom are recognised as intangible cultural assets by the Japanese Government, will be joined by innovative British artists at the cutting edge of the UK’s vibrant interdisciplinary arts scene. The festival’s aim is to communicate the essence of classical Noh and explore how its distinctive aesthetic and musical textures have become valuable resources for the contemporary visual, musical and theatrical arts.

Yakult, Daiwa Anglo-Japan Foundation, Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation, The Japan Foundation, Arts Council England and Arts Council Tokyo generously support the Noh Reimagined Festival.

Overview of the two-day festival:

• Highlights from the popular classical Noh repertoires including Tenko, Takasago and Toru performed by pre-eminent Noh artists from Japan, such as Yoshimasa Kanze (main actor-dancer) and Yukihiro Isso (Nohkan flautist and accomplished improviser).

• ‘Evan Parker Meets Noh’ A ground-breaking collaborative improvisation with the renowned saxophonist Evan Parker and Noh musicians, combine for an evening of virtuoso improvisation.

• ‘Masking and Unmasking: Noh Theatre as a Strategy in Contemporary Art and Performance’ explores the place of Noh in contemporary visual arts and performance, starting with a screening of Turner Prize winner Simon Starling’s ‘Project for a Masquerade (Hiroshima)’. This is followed by three collaborative performances and a panel discussion featuring Ignacio Jarquin, Andrew G Marshall and Michael Finnissy, Ami Skånberg Dahlstedt and Palle Dahlstedt, as well as David Toop and Wiebke Leister exploring the psychological and aesthetic significance of voice and face-masks in Noh.

• Premieres of new works for Noh instruments by Andrew Thomas and Nicholas Morrish-Rarity, who have collaborated with Noh musicians on the Sound and Music Portfolio programme over the past eight months.

• ‘Noh Remixed’ Award-winning composer/turntablist Mariam Rezaei premieres OM, a live remix of traditional Noh stories exploring experimental improvisation in live performance, with electric guitarist Adam Denton and Noh performers.

• ‘Cross-cultural Collaboration and Contemporary Music’ A panel discussion with composers Nicola LeFanu, Ruth Fainlight and Sound and Music Portfolio composers chaired by Richard Whitelaw, Director of Programmes at Sound and Music.

• ‘Movement in Noh: The Dynamism of Stillness’ A workshop in which participants will learn to focus their inner energy through the highly stylised movements of Noh.

• ‘Music of Noh’ A workshop offering insight into the unique features of Noh music, which consists of chant and song accompanied by the Nohkan flute and three drums to create a distinctive sense of ‘ma’ (or ‘space’).

• ‘Knowing Noh’ An introductory talk by eminent Noh practitioner Professor Richard Emmert.

Full listings are available on the Kings Place website:

Dedicated project microsite: noh.muarts.org.uk

Press Contact: Akiko Yanagisawa (mu:arts) Email: akiko@muarts.org.uk Phone: 07782343632

Kanze Kiyokazu at Lincoln Center NY – July 2016

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Good news for Noh lovers in NY this summer! Check this out (original article here)

“Lincoln Center Festival opens on July 13 with two elegantly ritualized productions with origins in Japan and China. One of Japan’s oldest and most venerated Noh theater companies, Kanze Noh Theatre led by Kiyokazu Kanze, the 26th Grand Master of the Kanze School and a blood descendent of the founders of Noh, makes a rare New York appearance at the festival. Japan’s approximately 700-year-old classical theater art of extreme refinement is known for its resplendent costumes and masks, hypnotic music, and intricately stylized performance on an austere set featuring a single pine tree. In a Noh play, the divide between the natural and supernatural is bridged as spirits and humans interact in a world rife with symbolism. Kanze Noh Theatre will give six performances, July 13-17 on an authentic Noh stage that is being specially built by Lincoln Center Festival at the Rose Theater in Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall. The company will present five different Noh dramas selected from the repertoire of approximately 240, as well as two Kyogen, the customary comic interlude in a Noh program

Spring Keikokai 2016

Every February members of Udaka Michishige’s training group, the Kei’un-kai, including members of the International Noh Institute, gather in Kyoto for a kenkyu-kai, or ‘research meeting’. According to the traditional calendar this is the beginning of the spring (立春), hence the name of this meeting.

This year’s spring kenkyu-kai took place on Sunday 14th February and has been quite a full day! Over twenty of Udaka-sensei’s advanced students performed maibayashi and half-noh. As most of us also study either the kotsuzumi or the taiko, on top of chant and dance, this event is a chance to play for each other, and to sing in the jiutai chorus. Sensei’s two sons, Tatsushige and Norishige, also join in playing flute and kotsuzumi, while Sensei himself plays the otsuzumi beats on the hyoshiban practice wooden block. What a day for Tatsushige, who plays the flute from morning to evening!

I performed the maibayashi of the shuramono (warrior play), and played the taiko in the maibayashi from Seiobo and Kasuga-ryujin. Recently I have been doing fast paced plays – I wonder what I am going to study next!

 

Noh Flute Workshop At Royal Holloway – London

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Noh flute master Fujita Rokubyoei is giving a workshop Royal Holloway University of London, where I did my PhD. This is a great chance for those of you who are in the London area to learn about noh music from one of the top-ranking performers in Japan. Royal Holloway has a great space for noh performance that has been neglected, and I am pleased to see the Noh Training UK project is making very good use of it.

The workshop takes place on Thursday 25 February 2016 and is FREE of charge.

All details here.

If you can’t go, you can still enjoy this video of Fujita-sensei playing the jo-no-mai music for a slow tempo dance.

Noh changes with imagination | Tatsushige Udaka | TEDxKyotoUniversity TEDx Talks

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The International Noh Institute

Udaka Tatsushige’s TEDxKyotoUniversity talk on Noh is finally available with English subtitles! Enjoy and let us know what you think!

Noh, a classical Japanese musical drama, is not just what you see with your eyes, but what see with your mind too! This talk/performance will show you that in interpreting Noh, imagination is your limit!

Tatsushige Udaka was born in Kyoto, and started his career in Kokata acting from the young age of three years old. He was trained by the 26th head of the Kongo School, Hinasori KONGO, as well as by his father, Michishige UDAKA. Performing since he was young, he has had extensive stage and teaching experience in Noh Threatre. He has travelled, performed, taught, and demonstrated Noh in Japan, South Korea, France, and the United States throughout the last decade. Currently, he is based in Kyoto.

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